Mid-term report

Before the return of my beloved tomorrow morning from his recent trip to Australia and Singapore, it’s also useful for me to take stock of my achievements, particularly given how much time I have spent watching the Tour. I’m pleased to report the ironing mountain is much diminished, although I have yet to start on the mending, the administration is complete and up to date, organisation of the forthcoming La Ronde is well in hand, the flat is spotless, the plants are thriving and I have ridden approximately 1000km.

I say “approximately” because I have been unable to upload recent data via Garmin Connect. Even though Garmin assures me all my software is up to date, when I try to upload, I receive this message”UnsupportedDateTypeException: Your device is not supported by this application”. Well it was until a month or so ago. My beloved has also been having problems with his device. Every time he tries to upload his Garmin data, the HP Photosmart goes beserk and prints loads of blank paper. We have referred the issues to Garmin technical support and are awaiting a response. They’ve not been overly prompt in getting back to us but perhaps they’ve been kept busy with the Tour. Who knows?

My kilometrage doesn’t perfectly correlate with my beloved’s absence, it’s mandated by my training programme to which I try very hard to adhere, at all times. I do however often spend more time riding than given in the programme. For example, today I was supposed to ride for 3 hours, to include an ascent of the Col de la Madone. My coach wants me to ride up some longer gradients ahead of my assault next week on the Alps. During the week, it can take me as long as two hours to navigate the traffic and get to Menton for the start of the climb. It takes me an hour to get to Ste Agnes. So there we are, ride over and I’m nowhere near the top of the Col and a long way from home. I decided to save that treat for Saturday morning when there will be less traffic.  I may even treat myself to a light lunch in La Turbie, a mere hour from Ste Agnes, before my 90 minute ride home. Do the maths: for me it’s a 51/2hr ride. Going via Col d’Eze as he suggested, it would still take me 3 hours to get to the top of Lance’s favourite training ride.

Next week, I’m down for a couple of hours riding each day. I appreciate that my coach has never been on holiday with my beloved. If he had, he’d know that there’s no way we’re only going to be riding for an hour or so each day. That’s not to say my beloved is going to make me ride all the day’s stage but it’s fair to say that the riders and I will be spending a similar amount of time, each day, in the saddle.  That’s where the similarity ends. I’m also very flattered that my coach thinks it’s only going to take me 90 minutes to get up Alp d’Huez. I am also having another run at the Galibier, the more difficult ascent. In my book, cols don’t count unless you ride up them from the steepest side.

Hats off to the walking wounded who rode today’s shortish stage won by Andrei Greipel who relegated Mark Cavendish to second place. Surely, the cherry on top of the icing on the cake of his maiden Tour win, in his maiden Tour. Well played by team mate PhilGil who successfully disrupted the HTC train. None of the jerseys changed hands today. They might not change hands tomorrow either on tomorrow’s flattish stage into Lavaur, the Tour’s mid-point, before heading into the mountains on Bastille Day. First up,  the Pyrenees. Let there be pyrotechnics!

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