Thanks for the memories

In a way it’s inevitable that we’ve made comparisons between last Christmas in Australia and this one in Austria. Largely, I should add, prompted by Facebook constantly throwing up photographic memories of last year’s trip. I had said I wouldn’t do a “where were we this time last year?” and, to be fair, I’ve not overindulged. However, it’s hard to ignore the contrasts.

The biggest difference is, of course, the weather: summer v winter. This time last year we were sightseeing in Adelaide and the surrounding area, ahead of the Santos Tour Down Under, luxuriating in the heat (35-40C) and petting cuddly baby animals. This year we’ve been out either walking or skiing and enjoying the sunshine, though not the heat (-3 – +3C), visiting areas we love and know well. We’ve thought about “how long is it since we were last here?” This, of course, includes working out what’s changed since that last time.

In both instances, we stayed in self-catering accommodation. We like spacious flats where we can stretch out, which have separate bathrooms and many of the conveniences we’d find at home. I enjoy cooking with local ingredients and confess to missing the oysters and lobster tails of last year or, more specifically, the markets where we bought our produce. Aside from the local well-stocked supermarket, this year I’ve contented myself with Innsbruck’s food hall and one of my favourite shops in Munich, Dallmayr’s.

Markthalle, Innsbruck
Dallmayr’s, Munich

Of course, I don’t cook all the time. In Australia, it’s never hard to find a restaurant serving something I can eat. The only one’s which are “no go’s” are fine dining establishments with 6-8 course set menus. Austria’s rather different. There’s plenty on offer for vegetarians, so long as you eat cheese and dairy. I am restricted to pasta with tomato sauce, pizza with tomato sauce and vegetables, large mixed salads and the occasional fish dish. However, the better the restaurant, the more likely it is to have or be prepared to adapt something on its menu for me. Meanwhile, it’s a refined form of torture watching everyone, including my beloved, tuck into some of my formerly favourite dishes.

It’s not all holiday though as we still have to keep the business ticking over wherever we are but my beloved tries to stay off the grid between Christmas and New Year. Interestingly, 2018 has gotten off to a great start business wise, and long may it continue.

One of the oldest bits of Innsbruck

 

Marien Platz, Munich

This year, we’ve spent just over a month in the same place although we’ve had trips to the surrounding towns of Munich, Mittenwald and Innsbruck. We’ve not explored as much as we did last year. Partly, this is because we’ve had many winter and summer holidays in this area and we know what we like to see and do. It’s less virgin territory and more of a trip down memory lane.

My beloved outside one of the many painted buildings in Mittenwald

Both holidays were pretty active in terms of both participating in and watching sport, though Australia definitely wins hand down. Largely because of the more favourable weather conditions but also because last year my beloved wasn’t still recovering from a broken leg.

I’m delighted to report that he’s been sensible – and about time too. He’s been much more cautious than before, when the idea of taking it easy for the first few days while he recovered his snow legs was total anathema. We’ve also walked a lot more than before, partly because of the weather and partly because my beloved’s leg gets tired after three day’s of consecutive skiing. He’s also stuck to the classic rather than skating technique on account of his hips.

Home sweet home

So, what are we going to do next year? While I would happily jump on a plane to Australia, I recognise that the business won’t allow us to have an extended stay and while a winter holiday was fun, I’ve become more of a fan of the sun. This was the last building block of 2018 and we’ve decided to spend it at home with occasional forays into Italy for some la dolce vita.  

 

 

 

Things in Australia that made me smile: Urban Environment

I’m a “townie” so while I much enjoy the varied and beautiful Australian countryside and seaside, it’s the towns where I feel more at home. I loved just walking out of our rental apartments and having plenty of shops and restaurants on our doorstep. It reminded me of when we lived in Bayswater and Chiswick. I love exploring urban environments. I’m never happier than when I’m pounding the pavements, window shopping, enjoying the local architecture or dropping into a local restaurant.

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In Prahran, our modern flat was part of the earliest developed block. While much of the town was built from 1890 onwards, the church (1854) next door was swiftly followed by the town hall and fire station (round the corner). Though many of the buildings have little architectural merit, other than age, the Australians have taken care to keep much of the frontage of key streets even if large apartment blocks tower behind. A number of former department stores and industrial buildings have been converted into domestic dwellings, again helping to preserve the area’s character and feel.

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Many of the early homes have wrap around porches and balconies decorated with wrought iron gingerbread trims, many of which are single level dwellings aka bungalows. All have a narrow road frontage but are very deep with the rooms running off a single hallway. I suppose this was to limit thermal gain well before the invention of air conditioning. They tend to have been built cheek by jowl with the neighbouring property and on quite small plots. It’s this lively mix of architectural styles you’ll find all over Melbourne.

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Despite the plethora of choice, I found myself returning time and time again to the excellent stalls in Prahran market, purveyors of wonderful local, largely organic produce. The Essential Ingredient, a shop within the market, was a cook’s delight, selling a wide range of fantastic produce and products. If only I had such a store on my doorstep in France. I suppose that’s one of the many advantages of having a melting pot population who’ve introduced all sorts of culinary delights into the everyday. Of course, I can buy all of these ingredients at home, mainly via the internet, but not from such a magnificent one stop shop. I also loved the eclectic mix of mainly one-off shops along Chapel Street.

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Where we stayed in Walkersville, Adelaide, was a similar but much smaller neighbourhood and we tended to wander over to nearby Melbourne Street to eat. Walkerville is within walking distance of CBD and the marvellous Central Market, a positive treasure trove of edible goodies, though we also enjoyed food shopping in the Adelaide Hills and McLaren Vale, buying from local and artisan producers wherever we could.

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Postcard from Adelaide: Part II

Our second week in Adelaide kicked off with live cycling. Sunday’s criteria in Adelaide’s East End nicely capped off my birthday weekend. There’s nothing better than watching a spot of fast and furious sprinting while sitting in the shade, sipping a cooling drink! Cylance’s sprinter, Kirsten Wild, won the ladies’ event, the second stage of the Santos Women’s Tour. Home fires were stoked when Caleb Ewan, the national criterium champion, pipped everyone else to take back-to-back victories in the People’s Choice Classic. Much was made of his victory over Sagan, but the latter was leading out Sam Bennett who, even though he got blocked, finished runner up. Sagan was third and afterwards you could see him proffering words of wisdom to Sammy B who’ll undoubtedly benefit from Sagan’s mentorship.
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Monday we were back at the Adelaide Oval where I had fried in the sun last year. It was a make or break match for the Melbourne Renegades v Adelaide Strikers. My beloved assured me he’d purchased tickets in the shade. He hadn’t. Luckily, I’d bought my hat, shades and plenty of ice cold refreshments. I’ve made sure he’s noted the East stand  is NOT in the shade. The match was nip and tuck but the Renegades’ superior fielding skills saw them win. The Strikers are now bottom of the BBL.

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Tuesday saw the start of the Santos Tour Down Under which steers a route through all the loveliest parts of Adelaide. I like to think they’ve taken a leaf out of the Tour de France. Stage one finished in Lyndoch but, having been at the start in the rather smart suburb of Unley, we thought we might watch the final four loops around the Barossa from Williamstown, southern gateway to the Valley. It allegedly boasts the oldest remaining pub in Australia, dating back to 1841, and several original farm homesteads, despite being rocked by a large earthquake in 1956. However, we finally decided to head for lunch in Lyndoch. It was pretty warm (typical British understatement) and we found a shady spot at a local restaurant where we could watch the peloton pass by. On account of the wind, and high temperatures, the race was wisely shortened by a circuit. It was win number two for Caleb Ewan.
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 Wednesday’s stage was pivotal in determining the overall. The riders rode out from Stirling, adjudged the prettiest town on the Tour’s route, completing a number of circuits before heading to the summit finish in Paracombe. Porte was on fire and no one could touch him, he finished so far ahead that, barring an accident, the laurels would finally be his. Thursday’s sprint stage was a trip down the coast from Glenelg to Victor Harbor. Our friends were staying in Glenelg and it was good to see the kids enjoying themselves so much. They’ve loved being in Australia and don’t want to go home. I can sympathise. Thursday and Friday’s sprint stages were hovered up by Caleb Ewan. It was looking more and more like an Australian clean sweep.
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Saturday dawned fair and we watched the riders set off from McLaren Vale where you couldn’t move for cyclists. We slipped away and headed via the back roads to watch the showdown on Willunga Hill, the second summit finish which confirmed the GC standings. Porte had achieved his heart’s desire and gotten his 2017 season off to a flying start. Caleb Ewan won the closing criterium around Adelaide to achieve an Aussie clean sweep. The fans were delighted but also been thrilled by the charm and accessability of world champion Peter Sagan, his second visit here, and Esteban Chaves, on his maiden visit.
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imageWith our days spent in the open air, we were quite happy to have a light dinner, relaxing and watching the cricket having profited by eating out at lunchtime in either the start or finish towns, enjoying the abundant local produce. But our time in Adelaide was now over. It was with some regret that we packed up the car and headed to our first overnight stop in Portland on our way back to Melbourne. We have unfinished business with Adelaide. We want to visit Kangaroo Island, the Yorke Peninsula, and Clare, plus spend more time in the lovely Fleurieu Peninsula. We will be back.

Postcard from Adelaide: Part I

We’ve spent two fabulous weeks in Adelaide, the latter half of which was devoted to watching the Santos Tour Down Under. This left us a week to potter about, enjoying our surroundings. We stayed in the same place as last year. What can I say? We’re creatures of habit and having found the perfect spot, needed to look no further.

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We arrived in Walkerville after a lovely relaxing lunch at the Serafino winery in McLaren Vale. The following days we settled into a rhythm of pre-breakfast exercise, followed by a quick swim in the pool (no shark sightings) and a late breakfast. We used our time wisely and enjoyed all that Adelaide and the surrounding area has to offer. Having already explored McLaren Vale, we popped into the Adelaide Hills to visit the Beerenberg Farm, a South Australian institution, which makes a fabulous range of preserves – I love them all! The company was set up in 1839 and it’s still run by the Paech family. We couldn’t resist stocking up with a few of their products for the rest of our trip and purchasing a few gifts for friends and family. Of course, it remains to be seen whether they’ll make in back to France in one piece.

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The Beerenberg Farm Shop is just outside of Hahndorf, founded by German Lutherans, it looks and feels like a corner of Bavaria. We’ve previously visited the town which, this time, was heaving with day trippers. After a quick wander around, we headed off for the quieter Mount Barker and a late lunch in an excellent bakery. Of course, I have to rely on feedback from my beloved whose palate – or so I like to think – has been honed by our years together. As we drove around, I did note plenty of spectacular property porn in the area, both historic and modern.

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In truth we spent plenty of time moseying around, either on foot or on the bike, in the beautiful Adelaide Hills enjoying the lush, verdant pastures choc full of fruit trees, vines or grazing animals. There are lots of small towns with a few historical buildings, I particularly love the ones with wrought iron wrap around gingerbread trims on the verandahs. Not, of course, forgetting the many open cellars where you can try the local wines, oils, beers and other beverages or enjoy a delightful lunch.

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No trip to Adelaide would be complete without a few meals at our local in Melbourne St. It’s not strictly our local, there’s one closer but it’s not in the same class. The pub also has a first class restaurant where I celebrated my birthday at just a small, intimate, party for two.

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Where we stayed is next to a large park which I’ve happily been running or more correctly plodding around. It’s nice and shady but I still work up quite a sweat before cooling off in the pool. Of course, we’ve also had to spend some time working. It’s inevitable on a two month break!

Prior to the start of the Tour we reconnected with our friends who’d had a wonderful time in Tasmania. Looking at their photos I was about to put it on my bucket list but then their youngest showed me his hand. You could clearly see his little bruised palm punctured by fang marks. He’d been bitten by one of the (thankfully) non venomous snakes but it had been a bit of a shock for all concerned. However, this didn’t stop him from handling the python in the Tour Down Under Village. He was a lot braver than many of the pro riders who much preferred the cuddly koalas and joeys – me too!

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A trip into Adelaide gave us an opportunity to look around the magnificent central market bursting with local produce. Given half a chance my beloved would have bought enough food for the next month. I really had to rein him in. The market adjoins Chinatown and we lunched at what turned out to be one of Adelaide’s finest. When faced with so many dining options I fall back on my default position, I pick the one restaurant with white linen tablecloths and napkins – top tip from my late father who trained me well. We later found out it was voted Best Chinese in Adelaide by a local newspaper. It was fabulous and we were fortunate to arrive early as tables filled up fast.

As well as watching the Big Bash League matches, we’ve also been watching the One Day Internationals: India v England and Australia v Pakistan. Whether this interest in cricket will persist on my return to France, who knows? But I’ll certainly be trying to watch the other Twenty20 series and any more ODIs. By far and away the highlight of these ODI games has been India’s captain Virat  Kohli, a man who scores runs seemingly at will. According to my beloved who’s had several recent business trips to India, Kohli’s hugely popular, more so than any other Indian sportsman but then cricket is akin to a religion in India, one which unites all faiths.

Postcard from Melbourne to Adelaide

It’s Saturday evening, the first one in January, and my beloved and I are enjoying a night in watching the Twenty20 return match, Renegades v Stars. Looks as if it’s a sellout at HCG and it’s going to be an engrossing game, particularly after the Renegades’ recent away win at the MCG.

We left Melbourne on Wednesday morning and drove via the Victorian goldfields to Horsham. Almost as soon as you leave downtown Melbourne,  by way of the Old Melbourne road aka Western Freeway, the landscape starts to undulate, with vast expanses of yellow scrub punctuated by trees, the odd farm and plenty of small semi-industrial buildings. The scenery becomes more interesting as we near the former gold prospecting town of Ballarat, for a coffee stop. Those combine harvesters have been hard at work, leaving golden, neatly stacked bales of hay and straw from harvested fields framed by more trees.

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The pastures turn lusher and greener as we head to Ararat, and lunch at a local cafe. Now they’re dotted with flocks of sheep, grazing horses and herds of cows as we drive towards the Pyrenees and Grampian Hills, yet another wine producing area. The Grampian Hills’ national park is on our left as we drive along flat plains punctuated by the occasional man made lake. We drive to Horsham, the main town in the area, and an overnight stay in a motel. It’s clean, spacious, well-rated on booking.com and Trip Advisor but the decor’s dark and depressing. However, it’s just somewhere to rest up.

We case the town for our evening meal. Many of the cafes close at 5pm, there’s numerous takeaways but the only place that’s buzzing is the local hotel (pub). It turns out to be a good choice and on the way back we spot a juice bar for the following day’s breakfast.

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Once past the Pyrenees and Grampians with their fruit, olive and vine laden slopes, we’re onto the flatlands where you can see for miles and miles. Golden fields awaiting the combine harvester, golden stubble being picked over by the birds and huge silos with mountains of grain, walls of baled hay and straw. This really showcases the green and gold of Australia set against a brilliant blue backdrop.

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We have a coffee stop in Keith and then the land starts to undulate once more and the earth becomes sandier. As we near Adelaide, the countryside flattens and becomes scrubby again, which only the sheep and goats seem to appreciate. We eat lunch at a restaurant overlooking the Murray river. The closer we get to the city, the greener the countryside.

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We’re spending the weekend on the beach in McLaren Vale at the request of my beloved. It was an area he enjoyed when we were here last year for the Willunga Hill stage in the Tour Down Under. I had booked a family run B&B overlooking the beach in Port Noarlunga. The house was built in 1930 and its interior is very much in keeping. It’s a spacious studio with a balcony affording us a splendid sea view.

As my younger sister would say, the weather’s roastin’ and we’ve been basted in factor 50, wearing sunglasses and hats and seeking shade or shelter in air conditioned spots. We had a gentle stroll along the shore and jetty and looked enviously at the bathers splashing around in the cooling shallow water. I couldn’t see any sharks but I wasn’t taking any risks!

After our hearty lunch, we settled for a glass of local wine and a few plates of tapas at the local Portuguese restaurant before retiring. When I woke up my beloved had already departed for his early morning ride. I waited for him in the shade as, despite the cloud cover, it was already in the mid-30sC. Too hot to laze on the beach.

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My beloved was sweating profusely on his return. Revived by a cold shower and breakfast, we decided to drive around the area. First stop, the Farmers’ Market at Willunga Hill to pick up some fruit and provisions for dinner. Then we rode up Willunga Hill and drove down towards Kangaroo Island before turning back via the Myponga Reservoir – a great training ride – and then along the coast stopping for lunch at a vineyard cafe. We moseyed along McLaren Vale but couldn’t take the heat. It was time to return and watch the cricket.

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Fortunately, the mercury fell by Sunday morning and my beloved had a more enjoyable ride before we headed to a McLaren Vale winery for a leisurely lunch. Then we drove to Adelaide and our home for the next two weeks.

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In case you were wondering, the Stars stormed to 200 runs but the Renegades couldn’t match them, falling well short. doesn’t look like they’re going to make the semis.

The bits in between – Sydney to Adelaide

As we left behind the lush, manicured, green suburbs of Sydney on our 1380km drive to Adelaide, we encountered golden scrubland punctuated by trees, grazed by cattle and sheep somnolent in the warm morning sunshine. The road was undulating at first with gullies, creeks and water holes but it gradually became flatter and, as we neared our overnight stop in Hay, dotted with small vineyards.

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Goulburn was our first port of call. It was Australia’s earliest inland city and is famous for wool production, which explains the town’s giant statue of a ram. We dined at the Niagara Café, first opened in 1902 by a Greek called Nick and still run by his ancestors. The cafe had last been updated in the early 70s and was clearly a popular luncheon spot. Photographs of Greece and its sporting triumphs covered the walls.

Some 250km later we filled up the tank in Wagga Wagga (many crows – another Hitchcock reference?), the garden city of the south. I have insisted, we fill up with petrol at every opportunity. I didn’t want us to run out.


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We broke our journey overnight in a forgettable motel in Hay on the Murrumbidgee River, another of Australia’s premier wool growing areas. During WWII it was home to three prisoner of war camps. I suspect no one ever tried to escape. We dined in thanks to the local supermarket as all the cafes had closed late afternoon and neither of us fancied a takeaway.

The following day, we were now on flat pastoral roads with endless blue sky, scrubby grass, knolls of trees, and plenty of cattle and sheep as far as the eye could see, and beyond, as the road snaked endlessly beyond the horizon.

We stopped for a light lunch in Ouyen, a small town at the junction of the Calder and Mallee highways, roughly mid-way between Adelaide and Melbourne, at what appeared to be its one and only restaurant.

As we drove closer to Adelaide, the countryside changed again, with more and more vineyards and orchards amidst the scrub, as we entered the fertile Murray River plane. We reluctantly gave up our organic tomatoes at the border control between S Australia and New South Wales. Just as well we’d eaten the peaches and apples the night before.

This leg was a question of getting from A to B as quickly as possible but it nonetheless provided us with some spectacular countryside, an insight into what life was like in the Outback and what a challenge it must have been for the early settlers.

The towns en route had charmed. You had a sense of going back in time, particularly when you looked at the cafe menus. They reminded us of small neighbourhood restaurants, providing excellent home cooked food just like my grand-mother used to make.

We also pondered what did Aussie families do to entertain their kids on long journeys before technology helped them out? It would have been pretty useless to play either pub cricket or even I Spy. Still there’s always the Spelling Bee or Mental Arithmetic, two of my Dad’s favourites. We sang along to the selection of tracks on my beloved’s iPhone. Luckily the roads were deserted so no one could hear us. Neither of us can hold a tune.

Postcard from Adelaide

After a very pleasant 10-day stay in Adelaide, I totally understand why it ranks as such a desirable place to live. With a population of around 1.5m, it has leafy suburbs, plenty of open green spaces, beaches nearby, an abundance of excellent sporting facilities, architecture spanning the ages since the town’s inception – many built from honey coloured stone with gingerbread trimmed verandas – lively arts scene and plenty of excellent restaurants all serving vegan/vegetarian options.

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We organised our stay in Adelaide around the first race of the WorldTour season, the Santos Tour Down Under, whose organisation is based in Adelaide. The riders stay in the one hotel for the duration and the longest transfer from any stage finish is just 90 minutes, though the riders can and do ride to and from most of the stages.

Adelaide CBD
Adelaide CBD

The event showcases the region from the Barossa Valley, the Adelaide Hills, Fleurieu Way, to the Shiraz Trail and the coast. It’s held during the Aussie summer holidays and the organisers slot the racing into a magnificent Festival of Cycling for recreational cyclists and their families.

Glenelg
Glenelg

Participation and inclusion is the name of the game and anyone in Australia who’s a cycling fan heads here. At least 50% of the spectators ride to watch part of the stage. We did too once the temperatures had dropped below 40C! Fortunately the climate is dry rather than humid.

Victor Harbor
Victor Harbor

The countryside is spectacular with vineyards, olive and fruit trees covering acres of undulating yellow ochre terrain. There’s plenty of small towns with family bakeries and restaurants offering great local produce.

Hahndorf, Adelaide Hills
Hahndorf, Adelaide Hills

While places like Hahndorf have a decidedly Germanic feel, many of the others make you feel as if you’ve stepped back in time to UK of the 1960s, though not the restaurants. My beloved was delighted to revive childhood memories with a fragrant and delicate custard tart and a steak pie, with a mouth-watering rich filling encased in light pastry. I can’t say it was just like his mother used to make him as she’s always been a dreadful cook but it was probably closer to my mother’s or grandmother’s cooking – wholesome, regional and seasonal.

New World Hour Record holder, Dr Bridie O'Donnell
New World Hour Record holder, Dr Bridie O’Donnell

Aside from the road racing, we were also privileged to watch former professional cyclist, Dr Bridie O’Donnell break the Women’s UCI World Record. Remarkable given that it wasn’t undertaken at altitude and Bridie doesn’t have a background on the track. It was such a special moment to watch history being created.

Adelaide Oval
Adelaide Oval

We also went to watch the semi-final Big Bash between Adelaide Strikers and Sydney Thunder. I love live sport and while I would never claim to be a cricket fan, 20/20 is dynamic, fast paced and exciting. The tickets are inexpensive and everything is done to encourage families to visit. The victors, Sydney Thunder, went on to win the final which we watched in our local.

We were staying in an area with plenty of great restaurants but one really stood out. A massive pub with a music venue, gaming room and upscale restaurant attached. It was justifiably a veritable goldmine which perfectly catered for the local population’s demographics – empty nesters and young professionals. While we were on target in the restaurant, we definitely upped the average age in the bar.

While Adelaide has a multi-racial population, there’s many Brits who’ve relocated there for a better lifestyle and I can now understand why. It might have been my maiden visit to Adelaide but I’ve a feeling it won’t be my last.

 

Wise words

A very dear and wise friend said we should celebrate we’ve reached the grand old age of 60 without suffering from any serious illnesses, ailments or injuries. Well, there’s no point in receiving words of wisdom if you don’t act on them. Her birthday was the month before mine and she rejoiced in style at the Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong.

Where did we want to spend January? My beloved and I were of one mind – Australia. Now, it’s a big place. You’d need a year to do it justice. We had five weeks, several of which we’d be spending watching cycle races. Now, come on, you didn’t seriously think we’d head Down Under without taking in the first race of the 2016 WorldTour season did you?

My beloved and I both enjoyed our trip to Australia in 2010 for the World Championships when we visited both Melbourne and Sydney. It would be unthinkable not to again include them on our itinerary, plus there’s the Sun Herald Tour and The Great Ocean Race to see. We’re taking our bikes so, even though internal flights in Australia are pretty cheap, we’ll be travelling by car and taking  in some of the coastal scenery and vineyards.

In no time at all, I’d sorted out our itinerary and booked everything. It was time pleasurably well spent. There’s nothing I love more than a spot of planning and preparation while my beloved is just happy to turn up.

We’re staying in a mix of hotels and self-catering apartments so that we won’t have to eat out all the time.  I also needed access to a washing machine to cut down on the amount of clothing for my beloved otherwise he’ll be counting the number of days we’re away and packing the same number of t-shirts, socks and underpants. He does NOT travel lightly.

We’re flying Emirates with an overnight stop in Dubai which should make the length of the flight a bit more bearable. Of course, I’ll spend a lot of the flight sleeping. I have my cashmere blanket, eye mask and headphones which I’ll plug into the music channel, pop on my Do Not Disturb sign, and get my head down. I’m pretty much the perfect frequent-flyer.

If bored, I may scroll through the entertainment options to see if there’s any cartoons I’ve not yet seen. I watched the latest Minions’ movie en route to New York in November – adorable. Surely, it’s time for Toy Story IV or Happy Feet III? Just a suggestion!

By my standards I’ve not organised too much while we’re away as we’ll be out on our bikes as much as possible. I have made a couple of restaurant bookings but some of the ones I wanted to visit have only tasting menus, and not a la carte, none of which meet my specific dietary requirements. However, this won’t be a problem given the vibrant dining scene in Australia.

If the trip is half as much fun as I’ve had planning it, it’ll be fantastic. Anything more will be a bonus.

Postscript: Thanks to iffy WiFi – surely the bane of all travellers – my posts are on delayed transmission.