Sculpture Saturday #31

Today’s twosome have been touring the Mediterranean and Atlantic coastal resorts, though not under their own steam. Here they’re adorning the Croisette in Cannes but I saw them earlier in the year in Monaco. Blue Eyes is a figurative sculpture by Richard Mas (1954-) who lives in nearby Villeneuve Loubet. After studying horticulture he sort of drifted into sculpture.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #30

This week I’ve again picked something more classical. Jeanne d’Arc is an 1874 French gilded bronze equestrian sculpture by Emmanuel Frémiet (1824-1910). The outdoor statue is prominently displayed in a public square, Place des Pyramides, in the 1st arrondissement of Paris.

The original statue was commissioned by the French government after the defeat of the country in the 1870 Franco-Prussian War and inaugurated in 1874. It is the only public commission of the French state from 1870 to 1914, called the Golden Age of statuary in Paris, the other statues were funded by private subscriptions. It’s been classified aa a  historic monument since March 1992.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #29

This week I’ve picked something more classical. However, you wouldn’t necessarily expect to find a statue of Napoleon (as Mars the Peacemaker) in Milan. This a bronze cast of the marble sculpture of the same name by Antonio Canova. It was commissioned from Canova in spring 1807 by Charles-Jean-Marie Alquier, France’s ambassador to Rome, as a gift to Eugene de Beauharnais, viceroy of the Kingdom of Italy.

It was cast in 1811 and De Beauharnais sent it to Milan in May 1812, but the city found it difficult to find a site for it. It was finally moved to its present site in the main courtyard of the Palazzo di Brera (now the Pinacoteca di Brera and inaugurated there on 14 August 1859 during Napoleon III’s visit.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #28

We’re staying in Paris. La Fontaine Stravinsky is a whimsical public fountain ornamented with sixteen works of sculpture, moving and spraying water, representing the works of composer Igor Stravinsky. It was created in 1983 by sculptors Jean Tinguely and Niki de Saint Phalle, and is located on Place Stravinsky, next to the Centre Pompidou.

The black mechanical pieces of sculpture are by Jean Tinguely; the brightly coloured works are by Niki de Saint Phalle.

The sculptures represent the following works:

  • L’Oiseau de feu (The Firebird)
  • La Clef de Sol (the Musical Key of G)
  • La Spirale (The Spiral)
  • L’Elephant (The Elephant)
  • Le Renard (The Fox)
  • Le Serpent (The Serpent)
  • La Grenouille (The Frog)
  • La Diagonale (The Diagonal)
  • La Mort (Death)
  • La Sirène (The Mermaid)
  • Le Rossignol (The Nightingale)
  • L’Amour (Love)
  • La Vie (Life)
  • Le Cœur (The Heart)
  • Le Chapeau de Clown (The Clown’s Hat)
  • Ragtime (Ragtime)

 

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #27

A giant Tyrannosaurus Rex sculpture sits atop the platform of Compagnie des Bateaux-Mouches by the Seine River in Paris, France. Created by French artist and sculptor Philippe Pasqua, the 4-metre-tall and 7-metre-long structure is composed of 350 molded bones, constructed in the likeness of those discovered in China. The colossal dinosaur skeleton is designed as an accurate depiction of the skeletal assemblage with a silvery finish.

The chromed aluminum figure was commissioned by Charlotte Bruel-Matovic, the daughter of the founder of Bateaux-Mouches, in an effort to support and promote contemporary art along the river. Its size and unexpected placement in the area adds a new and ironic sense of life.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #26

The large, painted steel, abstract work  Approaching Equilibrium by Melbourne artist Anthony (Tony) Pryor (1951 – 1991), one of Australia’s most respected sculptors, has stood outside the Queensland Art Gallery on Brisbane’s South Bank since 1985. It was formerly called Point of Balance.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #25

Larger than life and created from highly polished steel, New Zealander Michael Parekowhai’s 2015 The English Channel is an arresting sculptural presence. The figure, with flowing topcoat and ponytail, is the British navigator Captain James Cook. But this is not Cook as he is seen in the many historical monuments that bear his name – or in the famous 1776 portrait painting by Nathaniel Dance which is one inspiration for this sculpture.

Resting on a sculptor’s working table with his feet suspended above ground, this Cook seems to be reflecting on his legacy in the contemporary world. At the same time, his dazzling surface collects the reflection of everything around it – including viewers looking at it. Despite the sculpture’s considerable height and weight, this mirror-like surface lends The English Channel a slippery and elusive presence, as if to suggest how perceptions shift depending on where one is standing.

This charged relationship with place was heightened, in the sculpture’s debut presentation in Sydney, by its physical location within the NSW Gallery, in front of windows overlooking the harbour that Cook sailed past in 1770. The result is a monument of a very contemporary kind – not a full stop marking the end of a story but a question mark inviting response and reflection.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #24

This 2004 sculpture of a broken piano “Le Piano d’Arman” sits outside the Chateau de Villeneuve – Fondation Emile Hugues in Vence, after the artist gifted it to his home town of Nice. I understand it will soon be heading to the Musee Chagall.

Arman (1928 – 2005) was a French-born American artist best known for his destruction and recomposition of objects.

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Sculpture Saturday #23

This large duck sits in the gardens of a hotel we stayed in a couple of years ago, Château des Tourelles, Pornichet – La Baule. It rather amused me as I have a much smaller rubber version that sits in my guest bathroom.

An extensive internet search sadly does not reveal the duck’s provenance.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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Sculpture Saturday #22

This is a rear view of the giant stone head with cupped hand Écoute which is a 1986 sculpture by French artist Henri de Miller. It stands in front of the Church of St-Eustache, near the Jardin des Halles, in Paris.

This challenge is kindly hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

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