Thursday doors #14

Rather than exhaust my stock of newly photographed doors, I thought I’d dip into my photo archive for a few. This also has the advantage of testing the grey matter to remember when and where it was taken. One of these days I will get around to sorting out all my photos, until then…………………………

This one was taken during the Tour du Haut Var a couple of years ago while I was wandering around the Old Town of Draguignan, in the neighbouring Var. The Old Town has a number of handsome, historical buildings but, sadly, I’ve not been able to identify this one.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #13

I love spotting businesses, generally shops and restaurants, that have been around for decades. Usually they’re family businesses which have been handed down the generations.  As I was wandering around Castres in the January sunshine this door caught my eye.

If you’re wondering, the P stands for Pierre!

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #12

I have always taken photographs of interesting doors but since I started taking part in this challenge I’ve upped the number of photos. This is not really a problem because there are so many interesting and beautiful doors, wherever I look. And, I look a lot.

Today’s photo features the beautiful Art Deco door of Nice’s Town Hall. The building was constructed between 1730 and 1750 and fulfilled various functions (seminary, prison, cop shop and hospital) before becoming the town hall in 1860. It was totally renovated on the initiative of Mayor Jean Médecin, in 1930-31, when its interior and exterior was rendered in Art Deco style by architect Clément Goyeneche.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #11

It’s yet another door from Alassio, on the Italian Riviera. Bizarrely, given how often we visit, it’s one I’ve only recently noticed. It could do with a quick clean and polish to better accentuate its handsome features.  I particularly like the door surround and the contrast with the terracotta painted walls.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #10

These magnificent wrought iron doors (just one of a series of matching doors) belong to San Sebastian’s Kutxabank, which is a savings bank mainly operating within the Gipuzkoa region of the Basque country. It’s one of the bank’s many branches but easily the most imposing and it backs onto my favourite square in San Sebastian, the Plaza de Gipuzkoa. Of course, I just love all that gold-embellished wrought iron and the lamps (another of my obsessions) are pretty special too.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #9

Probably one of the oldest doors in my photo collection, this one dates from 5th century BC!

The door was not attached to a building but was part of the permanent exhibition at the Louvre, Abu Dhabi which we visited on our most recent trip to Dubai.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #8

This doorway belongs to the Parrocchia di San Martino Vescovo, an 18th century church built on the remains of a pagan site. It’s in Peschiera del Garda, a place we’ve visited a couple of times in recent years. Peschiera is situated at the south-eastern tip of the lake, on the river Mincio. Its historical city centre is completely surrounded by imposing bulwarks forming a star with five points, surrounded by a navigable moat. The first city walls of Peschiera date back to 101BC. Over the centuries they were destroyed and rebuilt many times until 16th century when they were transformed into an imposing defensive structure.

 

 

Note: Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments’ on Norm’s site, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Thursday doors #7

I’ve spent many a happy hour (and plenty of dollars) in the shop behind this discreet doorway at 693 Fifth Avenue. It was always my first point of call on trips to New York. I first visited in 1997 with an American colleague who was a big fan of the shop. I’d been dying to visit because whenever I’d admired something she’d worn and asked where it was from the answer was inevitably “Takashimaya!” I confess that some of my most favourite purchases which continue to give me joy à la Konmari came from this shop.

As its name suggests, Takashimaya is a Japanese chain of department stores whose first store selling kimonos opened in 1831 in Kyoto. The company expanded, merged with other businesses, opened overseas offices, went public and is now part of the Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group. I’ve visited its main store in Tokyo which, while rather spectacular, was a huge disappointment as it was chock full of Western designer goods.

The New York store sadly closed in 2010 as Takashimaya chose to refocus on Asian markets amid struggling sales. I can still remember my shock when I found that it had shut and immediately advised my American friend (now based in Europe) to share the shocking news. To this day we both still visit the site of the former New York store and walk away shaking our heads remembering the fun we had in its basement restaurant and the amount of money we’d spent on its beautifully curated collections.

 

Thursday doors #6

Today I’ve chosen a more local doorway, that of l’Eglise Saint-François-de-Paule in Nice’s Old Town. Its construction, and that of the adjoining monastery, took place between 1722 and 1723 on the orders of the the Minims, mendicant friars bound by a vow of poverty and dedicated to an ascetic way of life. The church’s façade, created in 1773, bears the Minim motto Charitas (charity) in a radiant medallion. The Minims disappeared during the French Revolution and the Dominican’s took over the church.

Its frontage is typically neo-classical with a few additional baroque elements. Its interior is relatively stark with a single nave softened by the use of double arches for the vaults and its horseshoe semicircle for the choir. These architectural features echo those of the Chiesa del Carmine in Turin, designed by Filippo Juvara. In particular, the grey coating covering all of the walls and the vault makes this Niçois church resemble buildings in Turin and harks back to Piedmont’s former ownership of Nice.

Thursday doors #4

I took a picture of this door while in Paris so it’s most likely in the Marais in either 3rd or 4th arondissement. Can anyone identify it?

I took it during the journées du Patrimoine in September 2017 which give the general public access to historical buildings not normally open to the public. I keep meaning to make a note of what I’ve photographed. Though I’ll often  remember, just not in this case…….