Postcards from Melbourne V

Yesterday, I decided to explore Geelong on foot. I had been tasked by one of my club mates to obtain a signed photo of Cav. I don’t collect cycling memorabilia; any autographs or stuff I collect tends to be by chance and I always take it down to the club for whoever might be interested.  On my travels I exhorted the good citizens of Geelong to come and watch the cycling as many seemed disgruntled at the disruption to their driving/parking arrangements occasioned by the racing. It must have worked as there was a good crowd all around the race course and a great atmosphere for the U23 Road Race.

I had wished the French team good luck as they exited their hotel (our base camp in Geelong) and while waiting for the start of the race noted that Cav was being interviewed on the quayside. I set off at a trot but was too late, arriving only in time to see him ride off in the opposite direction. I retraced my steps to watch what proved to be an exciting race.

U23 races are much more difficult to call:  the best indicator of form being the recent Tour de l’Avenir.  Home town favourite was Michael “Bling” Matthews, while my friend Ute favoured German John Degenkolb. Taylor Phinney was the bookies favourite. Almost as soon as the race started, American Ben King soloed away. A tactic he had used recently to win the US Road Race Championship.

Stars of Tomorrow

The peloton seemed unconcerned but the Aussies sent a man in pursuit, Ben King. Yes, there are two of them, both riding for Trek-Livestrong. Groups of riders kept trying to get away but were constantly hauled back into the main bunch. Eventually, two riders succeeded (Hong Kong’s King Lok Cheung and Belarus’s Andrei Krasilnika) and then a further two (Italy’s Moreno Moser and Britain’s Alex Dowsett) making a bunch of 5 pursuing, the American Ben King. His gap on the peloton never exceeded 6 minutes and at approximately the half-way point, the peloton decided enough was enough and stepped up the pace.

Meanwhile, the front group had splintered leaving Alex Dowsett and Moreno Moser (Francesco’s nephew, so another name with provenance), to pursue the American Ben King.  Moser caught and overtook King at about 3/4s of the way round, managing to stay in front until the 9th lap when the major nations decided to take control of the peloton. This provoked a major split leaving most of the fancied riders in the front group. The French made multiple bids for freedom, but each attempt was reeled back in setting up a mass sprint for the line. With 300metres to go, Bling Matthews came off Phinney’s wheel and launched himself several bike lengths clear. Degenkolb (good call, Ute) was second while, for the first time ever, two riders tied for 3rd place: Guillaume Boivin of Canada and Taylor Phinney. Not so much as a pixel between them. There was however only one medal, so they’ll have to share!

It’s all too much

My abiding memory of this Vuelta (yes, I know it’s not yet finished) will be Igor Anton’s bloodied, brave, little soldier face, waving good bye to us all, with his left hand, from the passenger seat of his DS’s car, as he’s driven away from what might have been his first Grand Tour win. Having hit a pot-hole at high speed, he broke his right elbow, took out a team mate (Egoi Martinez – dislocated shoulder), shredded the red leader’s jersey and large parts of his own skin. He was mightily handily placed and who knows what might have been, but you need luck to win a Grand Tour.

This past week end was a veritable cycling fest with GPs in Quebec (Voeckler) and Montreal (Gesink), Paris-Brussels (Ventoso), GP des Fourmies (Feillu), the end of the Tour de l’Avenir (Quintana) and the start of the Tour of Great Britain. A trip to Italy over the week end meant that I’ve seen very little of any of this cycling, but a girl can have too much of a good thing.

OGCN continue to defy the odds with a home  win against a lacklustre Bordeaux; not the team they were last season with Blanc at the helm and Gourcuff up front. AVFC meanwhile continued to confound by conceeding a goal in the final minute of their away game at Stoke to lose 2-1. Their best player tellingly was the goalkeeper, Brad Friedel.

What of my own training I hear you ask. Well, mindful of my forthcoming trip to Australia, my cycling coach has introduced running and gym work into the weekly mix along with some interval sprint training on the bike. We rode together last week and he had me sprinting in the drops, not something I’ve ever done before. Initially, I felt as if I’d lost control of the handlebars but soon got the hang of it. It certainly gives you a more dynamic position on the bike and, looking at the stats afterwards, I did ride faster.

Friday was my first “running” session. I use the term guardedly as I’m not sure the speed at which I travel qualifies as running. I had surprisingly sore shins the following day which have fortunately now abated and which didn’t recur after my run on Tuesday.

I rode with my beloved on both Saturday and Sunday. The weather is still glorious, although a little fresh first thing, and you’re starting to need to put on a light jacket when descending from the higher hills, like Col de Vence. It’s slowly cooling down but the wild life it still active, particularly the mosquitos and horseflies, whose desire to taste me is undiminished.

The run up to my departure for Melbourne is typically hectic. I’m juggling way too many things at the moment (huge “to do” list) and am praying I  manage to get them all done before I leave, otherwise I’ll still be dealing with them in Melbourne.

Postcards from Mendrisio III

I drove home from Mendrisio yesterday evening having had five very enjoyable days with my most hospitable Swiss friend and his mother. I had watched ALL of the races, ridden the parcours and met up with friends old and new.

Cadel crowned champion
Cadel crowned champion

Local Boy, Cadel Evans (he lives in Ticino), is the nearly man no more. Having ridden away from the other favourites, who were all marking one another,  in a solo attack a few kilometres from the line. He’s the first ever Australian world road race  champion. His team worked tirelessly for him and he’s probably wishing he could avail himself of their services for next year’s Tour de France.

It was a thrilling race, particularly in the final rounds when both Cancellara and Vino launched trademark attacks but failed to  maintain their momentum, probably thanks to their efforts in Thursday’s TT.

I had ridden into Mendrisio on Saturday to watch the Women’s Elite and U23 Road Races. Unfortunately, it had rained heavily in the early hours, giving the girls a few tricky rounds before the roads dried out. I should mention that the GB team were fortunate to even be on the starting line. The previous day, I had followed them down the one technically difficult descent. At a T-junction, our route was suddenly blocked by a policemen.  I yanked on my sometimes suspect Campy brakes and squealed to an abrupt halt, narrowly missing piling into several GB riders. That would have made for an interesting headline.

Saturday I rode to where I had previously enjoyed spectating only to discover an entire UCI Hospitality Village had sprung up overnight. So I retreated to the other side of the track, next to the platform for the handicapped spectators with a good view of the track and TV screen. The Italian ladies proved to be strong, sandwiching a Dutch former world champion, while the French boys more than lived up to their billing.

U23 road race podium
U23 road race podium

Romain Sicard, the recent winner of the Tour de l’Avenir, proved to be the strongest and no doubt will now be hailed by the French Press as a future Tour winner. Truthfully, the entire team were strong which bodes well for the future of French cycling.